chessblogger

An unexamined life is not worth living.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Learning from your mistakes - Lichess has best online chess features and is free!



This is a demo of the latest features of lichess. You can learn from your games immediately after playing them, review tactical mistakes, opening inaccuracies, all in the interactive training mode! I am very impressed with it so far.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Rook and Knight Endgames – Tactics part 2

Rook and Knight Endgames - Strategy and Tactics book looks at endings with rook + knight Vs. rook + knight. This material balance occurs quite frequently in tournaments, and some classical ideas and endgames have become well-known. Nonetheless, there is some lack of discussion of this topic in chess literature. The book covers both the strategic themes, and gives the reader a chance to practice their tactical skills. Mikhail Botvinnik was well known for his great technique in this type of endings; the book includes several relatively unknown examples from his career to illustrate the typical ideas, but also games by other famous players such as Korchnoi, Morozevich and Anand are featured. Here are some sample tactical positions (scroll down for solutions):

Korchnoi, Viktor    --    Tiviakov, Sergei
Warsaw AIG Life rapid qf4   2002.12.22     1-0

50[4]

# White's turn 1-0


Aronian, Levon    --    Filippov, Valerij
EU-ch 4th   2003.06.10     1-0

51[4]

# White's turn 1-0


Sutovsky, Emil    --    Bacrot, Etienne
EU-ch Internet fin   2003.11.09     1-0

52[4]

# White's turn 1-0


Dobrov, Vladimir    --    Kiriakov, Petr
EU-ch Internet 3rd   2006.01.22     1-0

53[4]

# White's turn 1-0

 

Solutions:

 

Korchnoi, Viktor    --    Tiviakov, Sergei
Warsaw AIG Life rapid qf4   2002.12.22     1-0

45[4]

# Solution: 29. Rxf7+ Kg8

( 29. ... Kxf7 30. Ne5+ Ke7 31. Nxc6+ +- )
30. Ne5 Rc2 31. Kf3 Nc3 32. Rc7 Nxe2 33. Rxc2 Nd4+ 34. Ke4 Nxc2 35. Ng4 Kg7 36. Ke5 Ne1 37. Kxe6 +- Nf3 38. h4 Nd4+ 39. Ke5 Nf3+ 40. Kd5 Nd2 41. Ne5 Kf6 42. g4 Nf1 43. Ke4 Nd2+ 44. Kf4 Nb3 45. g5+ hxg5+ 46. hxg5+ Ke6 47. Nf3 Nc5 48. Nd4+ Kd5 49. Ke3 Ne4 50. f4 Ng3 51. Kf3 Ne4 52. Nf5 Nd2+ 53. Kg4 Ke6 54. Nh6 Ne4 55. f5+ Ke5 56. Nf7+ Kd5 57. Kh5 Ng3+ 58. Kg6 Ke4 59. Nh6 1-0

Aronian, Levon    --    Filippov, Valerij
EU-ch 4th   2003.06.10     1-0

46[4]

# Solution: 39. Rxd4!!

A very impressive combination, even though not a strictly necessary one. Instead 39.b7 or 39.bxa7 were also winning.
39. ... Kxd4
( 39. ... Rxd4 40. bxa7 Rd8 41. Nc6+ +- )
40. bxa7 Rxa7 41. Nc6+ Kc5 42. Nxa7 +-
#

47[4]

42. ... f5 43. Nb5 f4 44. Nc3 Kd4 45. Nxe4 Kxe4 46. gxf4 1-0

Sutovsky, Emil    --    Bacrot, Etienne
EU-ch Internet fin   2003.11.09     1-0

48[4]

# Solution: 26. Nxa6! Ra8

( 26. ... bxa6 27. Rd6+ Kg5 28. Rxc6 +- )
27. Nc5 Ne5 28. Rxb7 +- Rd8 29. Kc2 Nc4 30. b3 Rd2+ 31. Kc1 Rxf2 32. bxc4 Rxg2 33. Nd3 Rg3 34. Kd2 Rxh3 35. c5 Rh2+ 36. Ke3 Ke6 37. Nf4+ Ke5 38. c6 Kd6 39. c7 Kd7 40. Nd5 Rh4 41. Nb6+ 1-0

Dobrov, Vladimir    --    Kiriakov, Petr
EU-ch Internet 3rd   2006.01.22     1-0

49[4]

# Solution: 36. Nb5! cxb5

( 36. ... Ke7 37. Rxc6 +- )
37. Rc8+ Ke7 38. a8=Q Rxa8 39. Rxa8 +- Nd3 40. Rb8 Nb2 41. Rxb5 Nc4+ 42. Ke2 Ke6 43. a4 1-0

Monday, January 23, 2017

Rook and Knight endgames – Tactics part 1

Rook and Knight Endgames - Strategy and Tactics book looks at endings with rook + knight Vs. rook + knight. This material balance occurs quite frequently in tournaments, and some classical ideas and endgames have become well-known. Nonetheless, there is some lack of discussion of this topic in chess literature. The book covers both the strategic themes, and gives the reader a chance to practice their tactical skills. Mikhail Botvinnik was well known for his great technique in this type of endings; the book includes several relatively unknown examples from his career to illustrate the typical ideas, but also games by other famous players such as Korchnoi, Morozevich and Anand are featured. Here are some sample tactical positions (scroll down for solutions):
Arnason, Jon L    --    Adams, Michael
Manila ol (Men)   1992     1-0

37
# White's turn 1-0

Zelcic, Robert    --    Gleizerov, Evgeny
Montecatini Terme op   1997.08.08     1-0

38
# White's turn 1-0

Apicella, Manuel    --    Vaisser, Anatoli
FRA-ch Final stage   1999.08.28     1-0

39
# White's turn 1-0

Reinderman, Dimitri    --    Chuchelov, Vladimir
Mondariz zt 1.1   2000.09.05     1-0

40
# White's turn 1-0


Solutions:
Arnason, Jon L    --    Adams, Michael
Manila ol (Men)   1992     1-0

41
# Solution: 37. Rxg4 Rh2
( 37. ... Rxg4 38. Nf6+ Ke7 39. Nxg4 +- leaves White with two extra pawns. )
38. Ng7+ Ke7 39. Nf5+ Kf6 40. b3 +- a5 41. Rg8 Ke5 42. Rf8 Nd6 43. Nxd6 Kxd6 44. Rf4 b5 45. a3 Ke6 46. Rg4 Ke5 47. Rg6 Rxh4 48. Rxc6 Kd4 49. a4 bxa4 50. Rc4+ Ke3 51. Rxa4 Rh5 52. Kb2 Rg5 53. Rc4 Rh5 54. Ka3 Re5 55. Ka4 Kd2 56. Rc8 Kc1 57. c4 Kb2 58. Rb8 Kc3 59. Rb5 1-0
Zelcic, Robert    --    Gleizerov, Evgeny
Montecatini Terme op   1997.08.08     1-0

42
# Solution: 39. Rc7+! Kxc7 40. Nxe6+ Kd7 41. Nxf4
With the pseudo sacrifice not only has White regained the pawn, but he also achieved a knight endgame, which is winning for him due to the dangerous 'a' pawn, and more active placement of pieces.
41. ... Nc6
( Defending the 'd' pawn allows White to collect both pawns on the kingside. 41. ... Kc6 42. Nxh5 +- )
42. Nxd5 Nxe5+ 43. Ke4 Nc6 44. Nxb6+ Kc7 45. Nd5+ Kd6 46. Nf4
Black resigned as his kingside pawns cannot be defended.
1-0
Apicella, Manuel    --    Vaisser, Anatoli
FRA-ch Final stage   1999.08.28     1-0

43
# Solution: 34. Nd8+! Kd7
( 34. ... Nxd8 35. a7 +- )
35. Nxc6 Kxc6 36. Rxf6+ Kc5 37. a7 Rg8 38. Ra6 +- Ra8 39. Kf2 Kd5 40. Kf3 h5 41. h4 Ke5 42. Ke3 Kd5 43. Kf4 Rf8+ 44. Kg5 Ra8 45. Kf5 Rf8+ 46. Rf6 Ra8 47. Rf7 Kc6 48. Kg6 Rh8 49. Rh7 Ra8 50. Kxh5 Kb6 51. Kg6 Ka5 52. h5 Ka4 53. h6 Kxa3 54. Rb7 Kb3 55. Rxb5+ Kxc3 56. h7 1-0
Reinderman, Dimitri    --    Chuchelov, Vladimir
Mondariz zt 1.1   2000.09.05     1-0

44
# Solution: 34. Nxa5! g5
( 34. ... Rxa5 35. Rd8# )
35. Nc6 +/- gxf4 36. gxf4 Ra6 37. Nd4 Rd6 38. Rg1+ Kf8 39. Nxc2 Rd2+ 40. Ke3 Rxc2 41. Ra1 Rc3+ 42. Kd4 Ke7 43. a5 Kd6 44. a6 Rc8 45. a7 Ra8 46. Kc4 Kc6 47. Kxb4 Kb6 48. h4 h5 49. Ra2 f6 50. Ra5 Kb7 51. Kc5 e5 52. fxe5 fxe5 53. Kd5 Rd8+ 54. Kxe5 Ka8 55. Kf6 Rd3 56. Kg6 1-0





















Monday, January 2, 2017

Uhlvestad Variation in Two Knights Defence - Full Repertoire Video Tutorial

To wrap up the year of 2016, I have completed the video series dedicated to a full defense for Black against White's 4.Ng5 in the Two Knights Defense. The video covers material similar to what I included into my e-book "How to Study Chess Openings", which now also has an experimental paperback (print on demand) version. I believe the actual demonstration of walking through a full opening repertoire should nicely complement the book's suggestions for how to build your opening files (also see these 3 videos for the related software/data organization guide.)


Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Modern Chess Combinations–Volume 7

Modern Chess Combinations: July, August, September 2016 is now out with over 120 puzzles for you to solve. It is available on Amazon. The Kindle free sample contains dozens of combinations, so you can first practice those positions and see if you like the selection. This publication is a collection of over 120 best combinations played by strong chess players in tournaments that took place the third quarter of 2016. I first filtered the correct combinations with various computer-assisted approaches, and then manually went through the entire collection to select only the puzzles useful to practical chess players.

The highlight of this edition are the games from the Chess Olympiad, where the USA team won the gold medal in the main tournament. Here are a couple of samples:

Heberla, B. - Ali Marandi, C.
TCh-TUR Super League 2016   2016.08.05 , B13

8 White to move

Solution: 30. Re1!!

Putting the rook under attack, but the bishop must guard the d8 square.
30. ... fxg5
( 30. ... Bxe1+ 31. Kxe1 fxg5 32. d8=Q+ )
31. Re8+ Kf7 32. Nd6+ Kf6
9
33. fxg5+
The final blow, since the pawn must be captured.
33. ... Kxg5 34. Nf7+ 1-0

Indjic, A. - Cruz, Cr
42nd Olympiad 2016   2016.09.08 , E38

10 White to move

Solution: 32. Bxe5+!?

The first move suggest itself, but the correct follow up is harder to find.
32. ... Kxe5
11
33. Qb2+!!
( The obvious 33. Qh2+? fails to 33. ... Ke4 )
33. ... Kd6
( 33. ... Ke4 34. Qd4# )
34. Qh2+!
With the king on d6, the check along the h2-b8 diagonal is deadly.
34. ... Kc5 35. Qc7+
12
35. ... Bc6 36. Qxc6# 1-0

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

History Does not Repeat itself–Two Grischuk Endgames

A curious mistake that Mark Dvoretsky would have included into his book – happened in the following game, where White voluntarily exchanged into a hopeless pawn endgame:

Robson, R. - Grischuk, A.
42nd Olympiad 2016   2016.09.10 , C67

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. Re1 Nd6 6. Nxe5 Be7 7. Bf1 Nxe5 8. Rxe5 O-O 9. Nc3 Ne8 10. Nd5 Bd6 11. Re1 c6 12. Ne3 Bc7 13. Nf5 d5 14. Ne7+ Kh8 15. Nxc8 Rxc8 16. g3 Qf6 17. Bh3 Rd8 18. d4 Nd6 19. Bf4 Bb8 20. Be5 Qh6 21. Bg2 Nc4 22. Bxb8 Rxb8 23. b3 Nd6 24. Qd3 Qg6 25. Qd2 Rfe8 26. Re5 f6 27. Rxe8+ Rxe8 28. Qb4 f5 29. Re1 Rxe1+ 30. Qxe1 Qf6 31. Qe3 g5 32. f4 h6 33. a4 a5 34. Kf1 Ne4 35. c4 Kg7 36. c5 gxf4 37. gxf4 Qh4

20
38. Bxe4?
( 38. Bh3!? )
38. ... fxe4 39. Qf2?!
The position is objectively lost, but trading queens makes things too easy for Black.
39. ... Qxf2+ 40. Kxf2 Kf6 41. Kg3 Kf5 42. h3
21
42. ... h5 43. h4 e3 44. Kf3 e2 45. Kxe2 Kxf4 46. Kd3 Kg4
22
0-1
Interestingly, it was pointed out to me that Grischuk had lost a pawn endgame that was a complete mirror of this position only three years earlier:

Le Quang Liem - Grischuk, Alexander
   2013 , D87

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5 8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O b6 11. Qd2 Bb7 12. Rfd1 Rc8 13. Rac1 e6 14. Bh6 cxd4 15. cxd4 Qh4 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Qe3 Rfd8 18. h3 Qe7 19. Bb5 Qb4 20. Rb1 Qe7 21. Nf4 Nb4 22. d5 Nc2 23. Qg3 e5 24. Ne2 Na3 25. Rb3 Nxb5 26. Rxb5 Ba6 27. Rb2 Bxe2 28. Rxe2 Qd6 29. Qd3 Rc5 30. Rc2 Rdc8 31. Rdc1 Kf8 32. Qa3 Qe7 33. Rxc5 Rxc5 34. Rxc5 Qxc5 35. Qxc5+ bxc5 36. Kf1 Ke7 37. Ke2 f5 38. f3 Kd6 39. Kd3 f4 40. h4 Kc7 41. Kc4 Kd6

23
42. Kb5
The protected passed pawn decides matters as Black is unable to defend c5 pawn in the long run and is falling into Zugzwang.
42. ... h6 43. Kc4 a6 44. a3
24
1-0

'History doesn't repeat itself but it often rhymes' as Mark Twain supposedly has said ...

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